Strivers' Row
Strivers' Row

HABITUAL BE

STRIVERS

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“I identify with Kimora Lee Simmons because she’s biracial like me, which can be a challenging space to live in. Because, who can say what is Black enough? And in terms of her Blackness, I think she translated that as a way of being, a culture, moreso your intuitive feelings, and that’s something I’ve dealt with my whole life. I developed my big personality over time as a protection, but she has that organically. She fought for her dream and never took “no” for an answer turning her relationships into a lucrative business.”

“I identify with Kimora Lee Simmons because she’s biracial like me, which can be a challenging space to live in. Because, who can say what is Black enough? And in terms of her Blackness, I think she translated that as a way of being, a culture, moreso your intuitive feelings, and that’s something I’ve dealt with my whole life. I developed my big personality over time as a protection, but she has that organically. She fought for her dream and never took “no” for an answer turning her relationships into a lucrative business.”

KIMORA LEE simmons

“There’s no Lebron James without Maverick Carter. He has to support Lebron and level him up to get him where he needs to be. You’re only as good as your circle and that team went to get it for themselves. They leveraged their opportunities versus remaining comfortable and growing stagnant. It’s really about what he does for the community, reaching back to bring up the next person, to people of color. My grind is all about putting people on and giving opportunities for their sake and not myself.”

“There’s no Lebron James without Maverick Carter. He has to support Lebron and level him up to get him where he needs to be. You’re only as good as your circle and that team went to get it for themselves. They leveraged their opportunities versus remaining comfortable and growing stagnant. It’s really about what he does for the community, reaching back to bring up the next person, to people of color. My grind is all about putting people on and giving opportunities for their sake and not myself.”

maverick carter

“Tupac let us know that Blackness is multi-dimensional. He let us know that social justice isn’t limited to a certain type of Black person and that even through survival mode, we have the right to celebrate. He showed us that the Black man can be powerful and still possess a layered understanding of the Black woman. We are not monolithic. And he’s from Harlem, so you know.”

“Tupac let us know that Blackness is multi-dimensional. He let us know that social justice isn’t limited to a certain type of Black person and that even through survival mode, we have the right to celebrate. He showed us that the Black man can be powerful and still possess a layered understanding of the Black woman. We are not monolithic. And he’s from Harlem, so you know.”

tupac shakur

“As a talent manager, your job is to make your client’s life as easy as possible and help their ideas come to life. Kamau Brunson has really inspired me to think about leverage and creating the financial plan to make that job happen. He helped me to see the importance in credit, building wealth and how to keep it. In today’s world, you really don’t need a debit card. Credit will take you further. His influence is intangible and has helped me rethink business and money management in general.”

“As a talent manager, your job is to make your client’s life as easy as possible and help their ideas come to life. Kamau Brunson has really inspired me to think about leverage and creating the financial plan to make that job happen. He helped me to see the importance in credit, building wealth and how to keep it. In today’s world, you really don’t need a debit card. Credit will take you further. His influence is intangible and has helped me rethink business and money management in general.”

kamau brunson

 
“The Fire Next Time  is a book I revisit often. James Baldwin was brutally honest about the treatment of Black people, regardless of the consequences. He was never afraid to speak to his mind. He was a proud Black queer who was all those things in a time when those things weren’t considered things to be proud of. I want to use my platform to call out the wrong and injustices and push for change. Because if we aren’t doing it, who will?”

“The Fire Next Time is a book I revisit often. James Baldwin was brutally honest about the treatment of Black people, regardless of the consequences. He was never afraid to speak to his mind. He was a proud Black queer who was all those things in a time when those things weren’t considered things to be proud of. I want to use my platform to call out the wrong and injustices and push for change. Because if we aren’t doing it, who will?”

JAMES BALDWIN

“Fannie Lou Hammer was so herself. A lot of the Civil Rights Movement was about respectability, but she was not—she didn’t really care about making white people uncomfortable. Her sentiment at the time is still super relatable today, Black women are still “sick and tired of being sick and tired.” We are grabbing and controlling our destinies in a powerful way. And Fannie Lou Hammer was so about that because you gotta do it yourself, no one will do it for you. She was a good example of Black women choosing their own paths and that while we lead the charge, we also need support because that gets lost a lot in our movements. You know, we also need nurturing. And I created Creative Smart Girl because while we’re powerful, we need to be taken care of and supported.”

“Fannie Lou Hammer was so herself. A lot of the Civil Rights Movement was about respectability, but she was not—she didn’t really care about making white people uncomfortable. Her sentiment at the time is still super relatable today, Black women are still “sick and tired of being sick and tired.” We are grabbing and controlling our destinies in a powerful way. And Fannie Lou Hammer was so about that because you gotta do it yourself, no one will do it for you. She was a good example of Black women choosing their own paths and that while we lead the charge, we also need support because that gets lost a lot in our movements. You know, we also need nurturing. And I created Creative Smart Girl because while we’re powerful, we need to be taken care of and supported.”

FANNIE LOU HAMMER

“My hustle is 100% from my mother. Having me at 20 years old, I witnessed all her adversity. I watched her journey through her career. She taught me about hard work and the importance of having strong ethics. She’s all about no excuses and having full belief in your capability. She’s always telling me, “Anything you want to do, you need to do. And if you haven’t done it yet, it’s because you don’t want to.” My grind is all about getting people to realize their greatest potential and live that out daily. I want to not only remind but challenge people to find their 100%.”

“My hustle is 100% from my mother. Having me at 20 years old, I witnessed all her adversity. I watched her journey through her career. She taught me about hard work and the importance of having strong ethics. She’s all about no excuses and having full belief in your capability. She’s always telling me, “Anything you want to do, you need to do. And if you haven’t done it yet, it’s because you don’t want to.” My grind is all about getting people to realize their greatest potential and live that out daily. I want to not only remind but challenge people to find their 100%.”

MY MOM

 

FAMILY FRIENDS

“As far as the Black music business, Berry Gordy’s Motown was the foundation. We all owe a debt to him. That’s how you got Bad Boy, Def Jam, and Roc-A-Fella. He created a space for Black people by Black people.”

BERRY GORDY

“Being a creative is a bold and courageous act. As a culture advocate & strategist, it's important for me to champion those who do the work. Thelma Golden has always come first to mind when I think of contemporary pioneers who do this well. Through her service, individuals and institutions like the Studio Museum in Harlem are able to thrive by providing opportunities to artists and access to the arts for the greater public."

“Being a creative is a bold and courageous act. As a culture advocate & strategist, it's important for me to champion those who do the work. Thelma Golden has always come first to mind when I think of contemporary pioneers who do this well. Through her service, individuals and institutions like the Studio Museum in Harlem are able to thrive by providing opportunities to artists and access to the arts for the greater public."

THELMA GOLDEN

“Pharrell was ahead of his time. He was a pioneer of originality. He always stays true to himself and comes back to his Blackness. I mention Diddy too, because of his multiplicity and his ability to get things done. Martin Lawrence has a great personality and talent. His creativity is timeless. I chose all 3 men because in their own way they break the negative connotations and stereotypes associated with the Black man and that’s something I aim to do with my grind every day.”

“Pharrell was ahead of his time. He was a pioneer of originality. He always stays true to himself and comes back to his Blackness. I mention Diddy too, because of his multiplicity and his ability to get things done. Martin Lawrence has a great personality and talent. His creativity is timeless. I chose all 3 men because in their own way they break the negative connotations and stereotypes associated with the Black man and that’s something I aim to do with my grind every day.”

PHARRELL, DIDDY, MARTIN

“Karleen Roy is the definition of creating your own path and if you have a passion, you can make it happen. She’s big on bringing Black people up and with her along the way in her industry. She’s the dopest experience curator. As someone who works in event production, she inspires me because she’s all about empowerment. She emphasizes becoming a better  you  versus becoming a better version of somebody else.”

“Karleen Roy is the definition of creating your own path and if you have a passion, you can make it happen. She’s big on bringing Black people up and with her along the way in her industry. She’s the dopest experience curator. As someone who works in event production, she inspires me because she’s all about empowerment. She emphasizes becoming a better you versus becoming a better version of somebody else.”

KARLEEN ROY

“Josephine Baker held herself accountable. She leveraged her platform and her power to influence. She refused to be disrespected. As a body-positive role model, she showed how dynamic Black women can be. Josephine Baker broke down a lot of barriers when it comes to celebrating yourself and the space that you take up.”

“Josephine Baker held herself accountable. She leveraged her platform and her power to influence. She refused to be disrespected. As a body-positive role model, she showed how dynamic Black women can be. Josephine Baker broke down a lot of barriers when it comes to celebrating yourself and the space that you take up.”

JOSEPHINE BAKER

“Myleik Teele is a woman who embodies personal development. She’s an impactful storyteller and educator. She runs her own business while uplifting women. She is a proponent of supporting people of color. She reminds us, you have everything you need in you already and to always be the best version of yourself. She’s a good example of the multifaceted woman. You can be a mother, the CEO of a business, and run your own podcast—you can do it all. I look up to her.”

“Myleik Teele is a woman who embodies personal development. She’s an impactful storyteller and educator. She runs her own business while uplifting women. She is a proponent of supporting people of color. She reminds us, you have everything you need in you already and to always be the best version of yourself. She’s a good example of the multifaceted woman. You can be a mother, the CEO of a business, and run your own podcast—you can do it all. I look up to her.”

MYLEIK TEELE